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So here's a challenge - in 2012 our site host (Yola) decided not to maintain blogging capability any  more.  So our old blogs are below but we couldn't add any new ones.  So we started a new blog at a different website.

The new blog "Ask Ms. Behaviour" is at Tumblr  http://dogfriendship.tumblr.com/) - the new posts show up here but look MUCH better on Tumblr...and you can subscribe to the blog by email so you get new entries delivered straight to your mailbox.  So just click the link and get the full-feature version.

You can also see the same blog material if you're a WordPress user at: http://askmsbehaviour.wordpress.com/

Prey Sequences and Stalking

Posted by Dog Friendship on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 Under: dog behavior

All dogs have some level of prey drive (the motivation to chase, catch and kill small furry or feathered creatures) because hunting and killing was the means for the survival of their ancestors.

Wild canines like the wolf and coyote use the whole complete and balanced prey sequence: 


 
Over the years, dogs have been bred that have prey sequences that have been changed and adjusted for different purposes.  For example, dogs known as Pointers have been bred to alert people to the presence of prey...but NOT TO DO ANYTHING MORE...letting the humans complete the sequence.  This is selective breeding for various purposes.  If you’re choosing a dog, knowing what steps have been selected for and amplified in the breed can help you understand where behaviour challenges can come from.  For example, sight hounds were bred to look for and chase prey that moves in their sight.  It makes sense, then, that dogs such as Afghans and Greyhounds may get excited to see a squirrel or rabbit in your neighbourhood and feel strongly about chasing it down.  Other dogs could care less once they've alerted you that the squirrel or rabbit is nearby.   With crossbreds the dog may display a mixture of their ancestor's traits, therefore this should be taken into account and where ever possible, if known both parents breeds should be researched.  Obviously individual dogs within both a breed and group will have their own personalities but examining the breed purpose can give a good idea about whether it might suit your particular home setting. 
  
 
We thought you might enjoy this video of Rasta the Vizsla slowly stalking down a wolf on a golf course and the other of five border collies at work. This is real time, not slowed down.  For those of you who have never seen a hunting dog stalk!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=IlyMUOfW6Ko>
&v=IlyMUOfW6Ko
http://www.youtube.com/embed/jaLor7d7NEs?rel=0 

In : dog behavior 


Tags: prey sequence  predatory behaviour 

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BLOG NOTES:  

Blog posts are generally written by our lead trainer, Helen Prinold.  While original posts on a topic may have an older date, here at Dog Friendship we are dedicated to keeping the information up-to-date as new info is available.  If you see anything in a post that needs updating, use the contact us form to let us know. 

So here's a challenge - our site host (Yola) has decided not to maintain blogging capability any  more.  So our old blogs are below and happy tagged and archived but we can't add any more.

 new blog "Ask Ms. Behaviour" is at Tumblr (posts still show up on this page, but are not tagged, and look MUCH better at http://dogfriendship.tumblr.com/). 

You can also see the same blog material if you're a WordPress user at: http://askmsbehaviour.wordpress.com/